Hot Best Seller

Padre rico. Padre pobre (Nueva edición actualizada). Qué les enseñan los ricos a sus hijos acerca del dinero, ¡que los pobres y la clase media no!

Availability: Ready to download

Basado en el principio de que los bienes que generan ingreso siempre dan mejores resultados que los trabajos tradicionales, Robert Kiyosaki explica cómo pueden adquirirse dichos bienes para, eventualmente, olvidarse de trabajar. El libro #1 de finanzas personales. Con un estilo claro y ameno, este libro te pondrá en el camino directo al éxito financiero y así lograrás que Basado en el principio de que los bienes que generan ingreso siempre dan mejores resultados que los trabajos tradicionales, Robert Kiyosaki explica cómo pueden adquirirse dichos bienes para, eventualmente, olvidarse de trabajar. El libro #1 de finanzas personales. Con un estilo claro y ameno, este libro te pondrá en el camino directo al éxito financiero y así lograrás que el dinero trabaje para ti. Padre rico Padre pobre es el bestseller que revolucionó la forma de entender las finanzas personales.


Compare

Basado en el principio de que los bienes que generan ingreso siempre dan mejores resultados que los trabajos tradicionales, Robert Kiyosaki explica cómo pueden adquirirse dichos bienes para, eventualmente, olvidarse de trabajar. El libro #1 de finanzas personales. Con un estilo claro y ameno, este libro te pondrá en el camino directo al éxito financiero y así lograrás que Basado en el principio de que los bienes que generan ingreso siempre dan mejores resultados que los trabajos tradicionales, Robert Kiyosaki explica cómo pueden adquirirse dichos bienes para, eventualmente, olvidarse de trabajar. El libro #1 de finanzas personales. Con un estilo claro y ameno, este libro te pondrá en el camino directo al éxito financiero y así lograrás que el dinero trabaje para ti. Padre rico Padre pobre es el bestseller que revolucionó la forma de entender las finanzas personales.

30 review for Padre rico. Padre pobre (Nueva edición actualizada). Qué les enseñan los ricos a sus hijos acerca del dinero, ¡que los pobres y la clase media no!

  1. 5 out of 5

    Troy

    I bought this book on the recommendation of a client, and from page one I was feeling uncomfortable with it. I pushed aside the part of my mind that was shouting "This guy is trashing highly educated people and the working poor!" and I was able to actually become enthusiastic about the message of the book. Here is the message of the book, and as far as I can tell, the only thing of value in its pages: * When you own something, it is either putting money into your pockets, or taking money out of I bought this book on the recommendation of a client, and from page one I was feeling uncomfortable with it. I pushed aside the part of my mind that was shouting "This guy is trashing highly educated people and the working poor!" and I was able to actually become enthusiastic about the message of the book. Here is the message of the book, and as far as I can tell, the only thing of value in its pages: * When you own something, it is either putting money into your pockets, or taking money out of your pockets. Owning a business or earning royalties creates income. Owning a house and a car incurs expenses. * Try to own things that put money in your pocket. * If you rely on earning a wage or salary to put money in your pocket, you will be forever caught up in the vicious cycle of needing money, earning money and spending money. There you go. That's the big message this book will impart to you, and it will do it slowly and repetitively in the first three chapters, leaving the remainder of the book for the author to drone on and on about how turned $60,000 into $80,000 without ever going into specifics. Early in the book the author lists royalties as a form of income. Later in the book he disparages a young writer who laments that she hasn't been "discovered" yet. He tells her to take courses in marketing, which horrifies her (as it would me). He goes on to explain that his best-selling books are best sellers because he knows how to market them. I then saw the $10+ I dropped on this book as just another dollar in his pocket. He writes about 200 pages of repetitive, non-specific advice with only one interesting message (see above), and people line up to throw money at him because of a compelling title and a tough-love story. Towards the end, I felt embarassed to be seen with this book in public, just like I'd feel for responding to a "get rich quick" spam mail.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    This book may do a good job of getting you excited about your financial future but the false information it teaches negates any benefits. I believe this book does a disservice to the public. I suspect it was written to appeal to those who are failing in the world's conventional definition of success. Didn't go to college? Can't hold down a stable job? Good for you! You haven't fallen for that waste of time and stupid rat race like all those other suckers! Saying that higher education isn't This book may do a good job of getting you excited about your financial future but the false information it teaches negates any benefits. I believe this book does a disservice to the public. I suspect it was written to appeal to those who are failing in the world's conventional definition of success. Didn't go to college? Can't hold down a stable job? Good for you! You haven't fallen for that waste of time and stupid rat race like all those other suckers! Saying that higher education isn't worthwhile is misleading. I agree it isn't essential (and possibly not even helpful in rare circumstances), but the high correlation in the general public between education and wealth cannot be ignored. He also gives poor advice in finances and investing. For example, not adhering to diversification. Or getting out of a stable job (a.k.a. "rat race") where "even if you win you're still a rat." The author praises learning correct accounting but then proceeds to butcher even the most fundamentals. For example, his first rule is "You must know the difference between an asset and a liability" but then he proceeds to claim that your home is a liability, not an asset. Completely backwards. Any accountant will tell you so. The book is full of exaggerated and sometimes completely false anecdotes -- for example, it appears the entire premise of the book is false -- there never was a rich dad and Robert wasn't wealthy until he embraced MLM and started selling get-rich books. If you just want some motivation, please try another book such as "The Millionaire Next Door." If you want sound personal financial advice, please read "The Only Investment Guide You'll Ever Need." See http://www.johntreed.com/Kiyosaki.html for an in-depth critique of Kiyosaki and charts showing the correlation between education and wealth.

  3. 4 out of 5

    L

    This book is not just about money. It's about how we are taught to think; how we are programmed by schools, family, and friends to look at the rich as greedy no good bloodsuckers and opportunities as risks. It is an attempt to reprogram minds to look at why we do what we do.. why do we buy all these shoes, clothes, cars, jewelry.. have we earned it or are we just trying to maintain an image? To me the most important thing it teaches is that being educated is the key.. educated in our motives, in This book is not just about money. It's about how we are taught to think; how we are programmed by schools, family, and friends to look at the rich as greedy no good bloodsuckers and opportunities as risks. It is an attempt to reprogram minds to look at why we do what we do.. why do we buy all these shoes, clothes, cars, jewelry.. have we earned it or are we just trying to maintain an image? To me the most important thing it teaches is that being educated is the key.. educated in our motives, in money, in the world around us.. educated does not always mean a degree lessons can be learned anywhere at anytime.. The book is great for people like me who think in pictures and in theory. He explains his financial theories clearly and adds diagrams to explain how money flows into and out of our wallets. I have read other financial self-help books and they were too detailed, too "do this...do that..." For me that didn't help or motivate me because, I don't do anything unless I want to do it. Other books never really gave me the why. They told me what I needed to correct.. but if I don't see anything wrong in what I am doing.. why should I take steps to correct it? This book broke down to me the whys. And now I am ready for action.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Rich Dad , Poor Dad (Rich Dad #1), Robert T. Kiyosaki, Sharon L. Lechter Rich Dad Poor Dad is a 1997 book written by Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon Lechter. It advocates the importance of financial literacy (financial education), financial independence and building wealth through investing in assets, real estate investing, starting and owning businesses, as well as increasing one's financial intelligence (financial IQ) to improve one's business and financial aptitude. Rich Dad Poor Dad is written in Rich Dad , Poor Dad (Rich Dad #1), Robert T. Kiyosaki, Sharon L. Lechter Rich Dad Poor Dad is a 1997 book written by Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon Lechter. It advocates the importance of financial literacy (financial education), financial independence and building wealth through investing in assets, real estate investing, starting and owning businesses, as well as increasing one's financial intelligence (financial IQ) to improve one's business and financial aptitude. Rich Dad Poor Dad is written in the style of a set of parables, ostensibly based on Kiyosaki's life. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز شانزدهم سپتامبر سال 2011 میلادی عنوان: بابای پولدار بابای بی پول؛ نویسنده: رابرت تی. کیوساکی؛ شارون ال. لچر؛ مترجم: پروین قائمی؛ تهران، معیار اندیشه، 1385؛ در 270 ص؛ شابک: 9646617751؛ چاپ دوم و سوم 1386؛ چهارم 1387؛ پنجم و ششم 1388؛ شابک: 9789646617759؛ چاپ هفتم 1389؛ چاپ دوازدهم 1392؛ سیزدهم 1393؛ موضوع: سرمایه گذاری امور مالی - سده 21 م افراد با آگاهی از گردش مالی قادرند، خوشبخت و مرفه باشند. شم مالی، نوعی جریان فکری است که از طریق آن می­توانیم مشکلات مالی خود را حل کنیم. جهان امروز، جهان پیچیده، متغیر و بسیار بزرگتر از دنیای گذشته است، در این دنیا کسی جام جهان­نما ندارد. در این نکته کوچکترین تردیدی وجود ندارد، و آنهم اینکه تغییرات آینده در چهارچوب ذهن ما نمی­گنجد، و هیچکس از آن خبر ندارد. یکی از دلایل پولدار شدن پولدارها و بی­ پول شدن بی ­پولها، و دست و پا زدن طبقه ی متوسط در قرض و بدهی، این است که موضوع پول، صرفا در خانه مطرح می­شود، و در نظام آموزشی جای ندارد. برای پولدار شدن لازم است در ابتدا یاد بگیرید، که با مخ خود پول دربیاورید. آدم­ها وقتی واقعا فقیر می­شوند که از تلاش کردن ناامید شوند، مهم­ترین مساله وارد شدن در میدان، شروع کردن به کار است. اغلب آدمها یک عمر درباره ی پولدار شدن، حرف می­زنند و خواب آن را می­بینند، ولی هیچ کاری نمی­کنند. داشتن ماشین و خانه­ ی حسابی، لزوما به معنای پولدار شدن نیست. آدم­های پولدار پیش از پولدار شدن نخست پایه ­های یک امپراتوری مالی را می­ریزند. ا. شربیانی

  5. 5 out of 5

    Allie

    This book has a picture of the author on the cover. I should’ve considered myself warned. But here’s the thing - I’m 28 years old, married with no kids, spent the better part of the last 10 years at uni and I work full time. I have spent my entire life studiously avoiding economics, finance, accounting and all associated disciplines, instead always choosing the history/politics/social sciences path, and then studying law. As a result, I have a big gaping hole in my knowledge, and no idea about This book has a picture of the author on the cover. I should’ve considered myself warned. But here’s the thing - I’m 28 years old, married with no kids, spent the better part of the last 10 years at uni and I work full time. I have spent my entire life studiously avoiding economics, finance, accounting and all associated disciplines, instead always choosing the history/politics/social sciences path, and then studying law. As a result, I have a big gaping hole in my knowledge, and no idea about what to do with the money that I’m currently saving. Also, I have this thing where I through phases of obsessively reading and learning about new things. A few months ago, it was fish and aquariums (I’m not kidding). Now, it’s learning about.. finance. I actually can’t believe I’m writing this, but .. I am. Rich Dad Poor Dad is a book that both taught me some things, and made my blood boil. It borders on negligent in many areas, and is downright offensive in the guise of being ‘helpful’. I absolutely agree with one of the premises, that many people are financially illiterate. I also agree that many people aren’t able to teach their kids money stuff, because they don’t know that much themselves. This book made me think about what I’m doing with my money and gave me some insight into the kind of things I am now going to look into and research. But it also scared me. This book is a libertarian’s wet dream that was written to be a bestseller. He won, I guess. It’s terribly written – it really is abysmal. This book bats you over the head with a few ideas (one of which is that The Poor should just stop being so poor!) through numerous “conversations” with his Rich Dad (who is supposedly the father of his friend). It’s horrendous dialogue; it actually.. I just can’t. It’s horrible. It talks about his father (the Poor Dad) who is university educated and hard working, but supposedly foolishly believes that getting an education and then a secure job is a waste of time. Education – what a joke, right? What a waste of time and money, that could otherwise be spent on high risk ventures that will always make you millions. That can be further invested to make billions. Rich Dad, however, never finished high school, and owns numerous companies that employ The Poor (read: stupid idiots) who work for him, because they’re The Poor. Rich Dad teaches us how The Rich do things, and why that’s all we need to do to join their ranks. The thing is, not everybody is afforded the same opportunities, and the point about high risk, is that risks are high. Sometimes it all comes crashing down. The world is not comprised of “the rich”, “the middle class” and “the poor” and even if you look at it that way, it is a dangerous (and derogatory) to consider that people are poor because they don’t make their money work for them. Because they’re “losers” (I shit you not) who are too scared to take a risk. It is fervently anti-intellectual. It totally disregards that not everybody has the capacity or opportunity to “pay themselves first” before paying bills, or quit their job to make money work for them. Money doesn’t just come to you if you try hard enough. Sometimes you need to actually pay your bills because there are real life consequences to failing to do so. Like, your utilities being disconnected. Your credit rating being destroyed. In my view, and in reality, not everybody can be an employer. Employers need employees. There is actual intrinsic value to things other than being an employer, running a company, and making money. Things like, helping people, making things, research, writing, hell – even working. I find it scary, that people would pick this book up, be motivated by it (because if nothing else, it’s motivating. Because everyone can be The Rich!) and be lulled into a false sense of entitlement, purpose and safety by its messages. I imagine that in person, Kiyosaki is a cult leader type person. As I mentioned, I’m not well versed in financial or economic things – but I can smell bullshit and see when inconvenient facts or complications are glossed over. This one is getting filed in the bin, and I’m going to continue my learning elsewhere!

  6. 5 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    I read this book while in an Entrepreneur phase. On one hand, it is rather inspiring, in a John Madden sort of way. You see, John Madden (American football broadcaster) always makes everything sound easy, which may be how he coached the Raiders to the superbowl. He'll say something like "now what they need to do here is score a touchdown. I think that if they can do that, they will turn this game around". I still recall a memorable game where a quarterback's contact fell out, and while he and I read this book while in an Entrepreneur phase. On one hand, it is rather inspiring, in a John Madden sort of way. You see, John Madden (American football broadcaster) always makes everything sound easy, which may be how he coached the Raiders to the superbowl. He'll say something like "now what they need to do here is score a touchdown. I think that if they can do that, they will turn this game around". I still recall a memorable game where a quarterback's contact fell out, and while he and the refs looked for it, Madden said "now here's a guy who when he wears glasses, he can see better". When it's explained in such a simple way, it really seems like the easiest thing in the world. Unfortunately, one must remember that the 6'5 defensive line is not just going to roll over and say 'uncle'. Real estate isn't any easier. There's always some conflict around the corner to trip you up and send you back to square one (or often, square negative one). So, while this book gives you such excellent advice as "learn from failure", "make profitable deals", and "work hard for yourself", it doesn't actually give you a system or method to make money. This seems a strange irony to me, as this book is clearly marketed to people who are not smart enough to realize that they should 'work hard and not give up' if they want to succeed, but who are smart enough to be able to figure all the rest of the logistics out by themselves. Now, there are supplementary books that give a lot more in-depth information, but they still tend to fall into similar traps. It seems to me that you are either the self-motivated entrepreneur-type, or you aren't, and that difference will show itself often and early in life. The self-made may use this book, but to continue projects they are already working on, not to start their 'dream business' from scratch. There is another option for the marketability of this book, but it is not one I like to think about: depressed people who feel their lives going nowhere trying to stave off depression by clinging to untenable dreams. For these types, self-help and new age books act like a surrogate (or additional) religion: bolstering their self-esteem and making them feel as if their dreams are truly within reach. Then, years go by and the dream draws no nearer. They get depressed. So they whip out this book (or another one like it) and suddenly feel like their millionaire retirement is only 6 months away! This makes them feel self-satisfied and complacent, so they end up doing nothing until suddenly, months later, they realize they're no closer to their goal. I'm not saying people shouldn't have dreams, and I'm definitely not saying not to follow them, and I know people get attached to their denial, but it's not going to make your life any better. More than anything, this book is a symptom of the cult of the real estate bubble, for whom property was never a bad investment: it would never go down and rates would always get more and more favorable. To say that their view was naively rosy would be kind. One day, so the story goes, Joseph P. Kennedy was getting a shoe shine when the shine boy started talking about what stocks were good to invest in. This is what we call 'market saturation'--when one area of business becomes popular, and suddenly, it seems like everyone is joining in. Kennedy got out before the crash of '29, and an intelligent investor, seeing how many books and reality shows there were about flipping houses, should have seen the real estate crash coming. Unfortunately, the fiscal prophets of the self-help section were unable to predict the coming apocalypse--so it's lucky for them that their money was tied up in book sales and speaking engagements rather than in the real estate deals they were pushing on others. I'd like to think that these sales would drop off after the 'miracle of real estate' turned out to be another hollow investment bubble, but in these dire times, people are even more desperate to find the path to economic stability. Now, I know that most people who (don't say 'peddle', don't say 'peddle') market these self-help (or new age) products are not usually scam artists. Most of them believe in what they do; they believe that they are helping people; and I hope sometimes they do. However, there is a difference between being a doctor and telling someone they have cancer to help them move on, and lying that there is no cancer because it seems more 'kind' or 'uplifting'. The latter, is, of course, morally reprehensible (said the atheist). Kiyosaki has built an empire off of this book, and made himself a pretty penny. He has also been investigated by some critics who have challenged his assertions about his wealth, real estate successes, and the very premise of the book. There is no evidence that his 'rich dad' ever actually existed, and Kiyosaki has said in interviews that the character is, at best, a combination of people. However, at other times he has stated that he definitely does exist. And that doesn't even go into his support of con artist Casey Serin. Maybe I'm wrong, maybe you will buy this book and it will turn your life around, maybe Kiyosaki is relating a true story of struggle and inspiration--but maybe not, maybe it will just be another $5 in his pocket and less room on your bookshelf for real economic and legal texts.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jerecho

    Read this one in 2004, but maybe I read an earlier edition... I think I rated this one 5stars. I have to review my journals, it's been too long, I can't remember what I've written. I'll be back with this one... Read this one in 2004, but maybe I read an earlier edition... I think I rated this one 5stars. I have to review my journals, it's been too long, I can't remember what I've written. I'll be back with this one... 😅😅😅

  8. 5 out of 5

    Danine

    I've been wanting to read this for a couple of years. After some recent events in my life I wanted to understand the financial thinking of people who were raised wealthy and those who were not. The first chapter was great. The storytelling was simple and informative. It made so much sense to me and I related to it. Then I started Lesson Two: Why Teach Financial Literacy. It was this chapter that I realized that homeboy Kiyosaki is quite pompous. I understand that he was using specific examples I've been wanting to read this for a couple of years. After some recent events in my life I wanted to understand the financial thinking of people who were raised wealthy and those who were not. The first chapter was great. The storytelling was simple and informative. It made so much sense to me and I related to it. Then I started Lesson Two: Why Teach Financial Literacy. It was this chapter that I realized that homeboy Kiyosaki is quite pompous. I understand that he was using specific examples in his financial success which is essential for writing a book in this genre but he was just being pretentious and inflated. It was a line in chapter six that made me halt and decide to put down the book for good. It was an example of how his friend bought a rundown house. Kiyosaki writes "It was spooky to look at." What? did this supposedly financially intelligent man just say, "It was spooky to look at"? He did. He's not worth my time. I checked out this book at the library. If I would have bought this book I would have made him $16.95 richer and me $16.95 poorer. He does know how to invent money by creating a need. The need is for people to buy his books and products. Kiyosaki's lectures and advice may appeal to some but I felt like I was being swindled. I won't finish this book and will read financial advice from people who are intelligently wealthy, more humbled and less pompous.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Will Thomas

    This book goes on my shelf of four books I read over and over, books I read devotionally. It totally revolutionized my outlook not only on making money, but also on education. I wish everyone would read this. I wish the close-minded, those who graduated from whatever school they attended and haven't allowed themselves a new thought since, could break through the stone walls they have erected around their souls and let this in. This message can save our world! I am not exaggerating. (May 24, 2016) This book goes on my shelf of four books I read over and over, books I read devotionally. It totally revolutionized my outlook not only on making money, but also on education. I wish everyone would read this. I wish the close-minded, those who graduated from whatever school they attended and haven't allowed themselves a new thought since, could break through the stone walls they have erected around their souls and let this in. This message can save our world! I am not exaggerating. (May 24, 2016) I just finished re-re-re-reading Rich Dad, Poor Dad. From the first chapter it was like watching a fireworks show. The insights! Admittedly, I love seeing things in a new way, and I love having a different take on things. What Kiyosaki has to say on education should be broadcast, read, and studied, and all education systems in the world should take him into account. If a lot more people would read and take to heart his financial advice, I think the world's economy would be much better. Now I have to go out and live this. And I'm starting the book over tomorrow.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nola Redd

    While driving for the Thanksgiving vacation, my husband and I listened to Robert Kiyosaki’s book, Rich Dad, Poor Dad, on CD. This book helped us to expand and to think outside the box when it came to money. It gave us many things to think about and other ways to view our finances. I enjoyed it so much that I not only listened to it twice on CD, but also read the book itself. In his book, Kiyosaki reveals that he had two fatherly perspectives while growing up. His biological father maintained an While driving for the Thanksgiving vacation, my husband and I listened to Robert Kiyosaki’s book, Rich Dad, Poor Dad, on CD. This book helped us to expand and to think outside the box when it came to money. It gave us many things to think about and other ways to view our finances. I enjoyed it so much that I not only listened to it twice on CD, but also read the book itself. In his book, Kiyosaki reveals that he had two fatherly perspectives while growing up. His biological father maintained an attitude towards money that kept him struggling financially throughout his life. His friend’s father, who he spent a lot of time with, held a different perspective, and ultimately prospered. The two men regarded money differently, which caused young Robert to compare and ponder the different things each dad taught. In doing so, he had to choose which path to follow, rather than just blindly accept what he learned. He applied these principles in his life, and, like his rich dad, prospered financially. I enjoyed the way Kiyosaki introduced us to both fathers. He puts us in the scene of action, rather than lecturing us, and like he did as a boy, we learn from actions rather than words. This is more successful, I think, than most financial books, which while helpful can be a little boring. Kiyosaki presents the six lessons that his rich dad taught him, and then expands on them. He provides examples and applications. Much of what he says caused me to change my normal perspective as I considered a different way of thinking. Similarly, as I read, I could see phrases that I and others have used that mark us as “poor.” In fact, over the Thanksgiving holiday, my dad unknowingly repeated about six or seven things that Kiyosaki’s “poor dad” had said! These statements have caused me to realign many of my thoughts on money. As we drove, my husband and I frequently stopped the CD to discuss not only the changes in our thinking but also the inspiration that occurred to us. We began seeking opportunities, rather than just blindly accepting the fact that we were broke. We discussed business opportunities, and chances we could “work to earn” rather than “work for money.” If this book has a failing, it is that it is more of an overview than a how-to. It left me wanting to learn more. However, I understand that Kiyosaki has several other books written that appear to dive into the subject more thoroughly, and I look forward to reading those. Still, this works as a great stepping-off point to make us reconsider our view of financial issues. This was clear, well-written, and thought-provoking, and left me wanting to learn more. It made for great discussion with my husband, and I felt like we both grew closer as we considered the opportunities around us. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wishes to increase their financial knowledge.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    This is a GREAT book! I can definitely say it changed my life and they way I look at money and finances. For example, my husband and I bought investment properties after I had him read it as well. It is very easy and interesting to read. READ IT! READ IT! READ IT! Here is one of my favorite lines from it, approximately quoted: "I have never met a rich man who hasn't lost a lot of money, but I have met a lot of poor men who have never lost a dime." True! SO TRUE. Everytime I lose money in an This is a GREAT book! I can definitely say it changed my life and they way I look at money and finances. For example, my husband and I bought investment properties after I had him read it as well. It is very easy and interesting to read. READ IT! READ IT! READ IT! Here is one of my favorite lines from it, approximately quoted: "I have never met a rich man who hasn't lost a lot of money, but I have met a lot of poor men who have never lost a dime." True! SO TRUE. Everytime I lose money in an investment, I remember how much better I am for investing and making my money work for me than just hiding it and hoping nothing bad happens to it. Also, I loved the story of the young talented writer who came to Robert Kiyosaki and lamented not being able to get published. He told her she was very talented, and that she should take a sales class. She was mortified. SALES? She was a gifted writer, not a lowly salesperson. (I excelled at sales, so I personally already was thinking she was kind of dumb.) Robert Kiyosaki pointed out that the cover if his book said "Best SELLING author", not "Best WRITING author". She was miffed. He was right. I saw some other reviews saying they disliked the way he talks about people with tons of education always being poor, as if he is above them and so much smarter. Honestly, there is nothing wrong with having lots of education and still being poor, if that's all you want. This book is about how to be smart financially, though. Feel free to be poor. I want to be a millionaire soon. So I learn about money. And I love and learn from Robert Kiyosaki, who is great at that. Lots of people look at him and get annoyed that he is so rich and successful, and don't like him. I instead look at how he is rich and successful, and try to figure out how he did it. Amen.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Cira

    Sorry, but this book is a bunch of mumbo-jumbo BS. The concepts in this book, to me, are common sense and there are no concrete applications to his ideas. Yes, the poor get poorer while the rich get richer, there's a ground-breaking idea! Yes, most people don't know how to manage their money, we know, so how about telling us how? The majority of the book is Kiyosaki wanking it, telling us stories about his life (which I don't even think are true). If you want to learn about personal finance and Sorry, but this book is a bunch of mumbo-jumbo BS. The concepts in this book, to me, are common sense and there are no concrete applications to his ideas. Yes, the poor get poorer while the rich get richer, there's a ground-breaking idea! Yes, most people don't know how to manage their money, we know, so how about telling us how? The majority of the book is Kiyosaki wanking it, telling us stories about his life (which I don't even think are true). If you want to learn about personal finance and investment strategies, this is not the book for you.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    The life changing book that has been a personal finance best seller for over a decade written by author Robert T. Kiyosaki. This little book has changed the lives of many people and their perspective on money, who are in misery, not knowing how to make ends meet due to lack of financial education. The contents of this book, tells the story of a young man, who is the author himself, being brought up by his natural father the conventional way of getting a job, saving every penny, working hard and The life changing book that has been a personal finance best seller for over a decade written by author Robert T. Kiyosaki. This little book has changed the lives of many people and their perspective on money, who are in misery, not knowing how to make ends meet due to lack of financial education. The contents of this book, tells the story of a young man, who is the author himself, being brought up by his natural father the conventional way of getting a job, saving every penny, working hard and climbing the corporate ladder. At the same time, he also had a "second father" who taught him a different way to view things and how to start from scratch and build his business into an empire. I am sure many of us can relate to the story on the part where we were being brought up the conventional way to become workers. As much as we don't wish it to be that way, ironically, the education system plays a very big part in educating our fathers and their fathers to be trained into workers instead of educating them and inspire them to become business owners. Ignorance of other available choices, we are trapped in a eternal cycle of working for money, saving up and spending on wasting assets that constantly drains our finances and loses value over time. Welcome to the rat race! Unless we learn and educate ourselves on personal finance, we will be unknowingly stuck with only one way of thinking, and passing that knowledge on to the next generation. Talk about vicious cycle! The main point of this book is to educate yourself on personal finance, which is to learn how to become financially independent by making money work hard for you and not you working hard to earn every single penny. It teaches you that you do not have to be a slave to money and to turn the situation to your advantage. There is no need for you to work for another person if you do not want to, in order to fulfill what you want in life. You are in control of your situation and you no longer need to take orders from anyone. You decide how much work you need. You are your own boss! This book has certainly made a huge impact on my life, why not read it and see if it will change yours as well? Make that difference now. Review by Ben Ang Article Source: Ben Ang

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shalini Sinha

    The signal to noise ratio is not very good in this book. But there are already many useful critical reviews on GR, so, I'll just talk about the important takeaways. It's a generic self-help book which talks of "what" one should do (/not do) and not "how". If one is looking for practical advices related to investing, this is not an apt book to pick up. Important takeaways : 1) Be financially literate. This makes the majority of the content of the book. Have at least minimal knowledge of a) The signal to noise ratio is not very good in this book. But there are already many useful critical reviews on GR, so, I'll just talk about the important takeaways. It's a generic self-help book which talks of "what" one should do (/not do) and not "how". If one is looking for practical advices related to investing, this is not an apt book to pick up. Important takeaways : 1) Be financially literate. This makes the majority of the content of the book. Have at least minimal knowledge of a) Accounting b) Investing c) Understanding markets d) Laws - tax advantages and protection from lawsuits 2) Have total financial self-reliance vs reliance on managers for investment advices. 3) Buy income generating assets (stocks, bonds, mutual funds, real estate). Keep liabilities and expenses down. After asset base is good, make speculative investments (big and risky). Investment is not risky, the lack of financial intelligence is. Buy luxuries last. Always ask do I really need to buy this. 4) Learn business systems, sales and marketing skills, become better at communicating, negotiating, handling fear of rejection, fear of losing money and overcoming cynicism. 5) Read Peter Lynch to learn how to choose stocks. There is also a short biography of Robert Kiyosaki who definitely had an adventurous childhood. He became part of some small businesses at an early age of 9 and was quite imaginative in identifying opportunities to make money. Do I recommend it? I do think that for a generation which grew up with internet and browsing Quora or Medium, most of the content in the book is common knowledge. Also it's a self-help and not an actual investing book. But it's a short and simple read and okay to read for a beginner. Also note that almost all the time when the author uses "poor", he is referring to the middle class and not actual poor who don't have access to basic opportunities. Recommended only for beginners.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Archit Ojha

    A wonderful book for anyone who wants to be an entrepreneur. Enlightening about assets and liabilities, the book provides real life examples and scenarios. A must read for the beginners.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Angela Randall

    I thought this book was great! Along with being a very pleasant read it had many valuable financial lessons to teach us. I’ll quickly go through some of the very important points. We really don’t get taught anything about financial management in school. I’m shocked at how many of my friends know nothing about how their credit card works, let alone how to use simple accounting to correctly assess their financial position. We need to have financial literacy to survive. The book explores the types of I thought this book was great! Along with being a very pleasant read it had many valuable financial lessons to teach us. I’ll quickly go through some of the very important points. We really don’t get taught anything about financial management in school. I’m shocked at how many of my friends know nothing about how their credit card works, let alone how to use simple accounting to correctly assess their financial position. We need to have financial literacy to survive. The book explores the types of financial management lessons the rich teach their children. These are the lessons that the poor and middle class miss out on. They are simple and basically revolve around learning as much as possible so that you can make educated decisions about money. Most importantly, this book gives you some basic ideas of things you will need to learn more about.. so you’re not just learning useless facts and you are in fact learning the right things to become financially literate. A most important thing to learn from this book is that you don’t get rich working for money. Wages will only keep you just above broke. Seriously, how many times do we have to be told this before we believe it enough to change our lives? Get out of the rat race! “Most people never see the trap they are in.” — Robert T Kiyosaki Most people work because they are afraid of not having money or they desire things that they think will make them happy. Then they are stuck working for fear of losing that income. They want security. The aim is to not let money run your life. Curb your desires and don’t be afraid of having nothing. Beware of the hole in your pocket. Don’t let your emotions rule your decision making. Think with your head! “With each dollar bill that enters your hand, you and only you have the power to determine your destiny. Spend it foolishly, you choose to be poor. Spend it on liabilities, you choose to be middle class. Invest it in your mind and learn how to acquire assets and you will be choosing wealth as your goal and future. The choice is yours and only yours. Every day with every dollar, you choose to be rich, poor or middle class.” — Robert T Kiyosaki Learn to correctly identify assets and then buy assets. For most people, a home is a liability not an asset. Assets put money back into your pocket. Make every dollar you get work for you. Invest it. Then it will come back as more income. Easy! “Build and keep your asset column strong. Once a dollar goes into it, never let it come out. Think of it this way, once a dollar goes into your asset column, it becomes your employee. ” — Robert T Kiyosaki Always make sure you pay yourself first - and that means assets, not splurging! If you invest your money wisely it will create the income you need to pay the bills later. Plus, it will scare you into making your brain think about how to create some more money in the meantime. Forbid the words “I can’t afford it” and replace them with “How can I afford it?”. You’ll turn your brain on and force it to come up with a solution. Learn legal ways to avoid paying so much in taxes. Protect your investments through corporations. Corporations pay less in tax than the highest income brackets. Now, due to the tiering structure in Australia you’d have to be earning quite a bit before a flat 30% tax rate was less expensive than your tiered rate. But the point is to LEARN. Find out about taxes and legal ways to minimise them. Talk to an accountant about your current situation. Hire intelligent people to help you. Don’t just do what everyone else does. Educate yourself and then take educated risks! You’ll get better at it every time you try it. “Sometimes you win and sometimes you learn.” — Robert T Kiyosaki Ensure you have enough money not tied up to be able to take advantage of good opportunities. Just like when you are playing Monopoly, you need to ensure you have sufficient cash to buy properties in auction or you could miss a bargain. Young people should develop investment portfolios before deciding to own a house. The benefits of the extra years on the portfolio are phenomenal. What are the best types of assets? Things that make money by themselves: Businesses that don’t require your presence, managed funds, stocks, bonds, royalties and income-generating real estate. “Money is only an idea. If you want more money simply change your thinking” — Robert T Kiyosaki To start off with, most people need to earn a wage to get their initial funds for investing. This doesn’t have to lead to a career. Choose jobs according to what you will learn from them. Groom yourself as a CEO would groom an young, rising star. Learn a little bit about everything and try not to over-specialise. Specialisation is a risk in itself. What happens if that profession becomes redundant? Where will you be then? Get over your fear, cynicism, laziness, bad habits and arrogance. Fear of losing, rejection, lack of money. We learn by making mistakes. Make some! If what you’re currently doing isn’t working you have to change it. Stop being a cynic and ask wealthy people you know how they did it. Find role models. Read books. Look for new ideas. Go to seminars. Learn! Beat laziness by asking yourself “What’s in it for me?”. Get off your butt and do something about your situation. Now! “A person needs to sit down and ask, ‘What’s in it for me if I’m healthy, sexy and good looking?’ Or ‘What would my life be like if I never had to work again’ Or ‘What would I do if I had all the money I needed?’. Without a little greed, the desire to have something better, progress is not made.” — Robert T Kiyosaki To receive you must give. Give generously. Teach others what you know as you will learn more also. Help others to have what you want as you will gain also. Give money to charity. Smile at people. Help others gain contacts and sales. What you give will come back. - Curb your desires and get rid of the hole in your pocket - Make every dollar work for you - Always think "How can I afford it?" - Change what you're doing to something that works - Learn about finance, accounting and taxes - Learn about business communication, sales, advertising and PR - Learn about management: cash flow, systems, personal time management and people - Get over your fear of rejection and fear of failure - Work with people smarter than you are - Work to learn - Give generously - Learn about investment options - Learn about how to raise money to finance good opportunities - Keep your finances ready to take advantage of a great deal - Always keep your eye out for good investment opportunities - Make offers - TAKE ACTION!! “Action always beats inaction.” — Robert T Kiyosaki Personal plug - I originally reviewed this book for my self-help blog, which is here: http://bootstrapyourlife.net/

  17. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    There were things that I liked and things that I disliked about this book. Dislikes: *Author makes exaggerations, blanket statements, and assumptions and then presents them as facts. (i.e. He states that Americans pay 50% in income taxes. Not many Americans are in this tax bracket, certainly not the person that would be reading this book!) *Author doesn't understand economics, politics and law well. For instance he states that "Our staggering national debt is due in large part to highly educated There were things that I liked and things that I disliked about this book. Dislikes: *Author makes exaggerations, blanket statements, and assumptions and then presents them as facts. (i.e. He states that Americans pay 50% in income taxes. Not many Americans are in this tax bracket, certainly not the person that would be reading this book!) *Author doesn't understand economics, politics and law well. For instance he states that "Our staggering national debt is due in large part to highly educated politicians and government officials making financial decisions with little or no training on the subject of money" ( p. 14). I do not believe that our politicians lack education or training on money. I believe it is because our politicians lust after greed and power and are not willing to live within a budget. In regards to spending they are only thinking of the present, not the future. *The book is poorly written and edited (I should be careful when I make a critcism like this, it's not like I have written any books.) Likes: *The author says that the most important thing to invest in is your own financial literacy. He says that we should always be looking to learn something new because things are always changing. You have to stay educated so you can recognize an new opportunity. *I like how the author challenges the "conveyor belt" ideas regarding money, spending, employment (For instance, he challenges the idea of only relying on an employer. He encourages the reader to take matters into their own hands and make money work for you instead of working for money) , investing and wealth. *He never claims to have the answers he just sends you out to find them for yourself. Although he presents "examples". *I like how the author encourages the reader to be generous with his/her money. He encourages us to give to charities and to people with less. *I like how the author is a capitalist. He believes in the American dream. He challenges the socialist ideas and entitlement mood of the country. I understood a main theme to be get out there and help yourself instead of relying upon government and society. *I like how the author discourages consumer debt. He discourages any spending that is trying to "keep up with the Jones". He discourages buying luxuries on credit. He doesn't say that luxuries are bad, just wait until you can save up and afford them. I have heard many opinions of this book. They seem to be love or hate. I like the book. Overall I found it inspiring and encouraging. The book has made me want to be more proactive in managing and investing in my own finances instead of relying on and waiting for my husband to get the next raise.

  18. 5 out of 5

    The other John

    "And I will say to my soul, 'Soul, you have many goods laid up for many years to come; take your ease, eat, drink and be merry.'" But God said to him, "You fool! This very night your soul is required of you; and now who will own what you have prepared?" That parable popped into my mind when I read this book. This book is about "what the rich teach their kids about money that the poor and middle class do not." It's not so much a manual on how to get rich, but more of a book on the underlying "And I will say to my soul, 'Soul, you have many goods laid up for many years to come; take your ease, eat, drink and be merry.'" But God said to him, "You fool! This very night your soul is required of you; and now who will own what you have prepared?" That parable popped into my mind when I read this book. This book is about "what the rich teach their kids about money that the poor and middle class do not." It's not so much a manual on how to get rich, but more of a book on the underlying worldview of the wealthy. In it Mr. Kiyosaki contrasts his own father--Poor Dad--who got a good education, worked hard, but never quite made it big, with the father of one of his friends, who was quite successful and took Mr. Kiyosaki under his wing. I was moved to read this book because, as I've been looking over my finances, I wonder if I might not have been doing things wrong. It turns out that I'm not totally off Mr. Kiyosaki's track. By the grace of God I've been able to avoid major debt and I tend to avoid transient luxuries such as fancy cars and the latest electronic gadgets. (Of course, my two year "vacation" overseas was hardly a wealth building choice.) On the other hand, I'm too lazy to work hard and invest my finances responsibly. I'm content to stick my excess cash in the bank and forget about it. So has the book changed me? I don't know. I don't need to be rich, but I sure do covet the financial independence that wealth can buy. Even while I recognize the wisdom that Mr. Kiyosaki offers, I couldn't really buy into his world view. I'm going to have to think about this some more before I make any lifestyle changes. Could I recommend this book? Well, it was an enjoyable read despite the fact that I find finances boring. But I have two big reservations about it. The first that it was written about ten years ago, in a different financial climate. The second is that Mr. Kiyosaki has other books and materials for sale. I sometimes wonder if maybe the unspoken secret to financial success is to get a lot of people to buy your books and attend your seminars. Caveat emptor!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jocylynn

    My father handed me this book two nights ago, and said something to the effect of "interesting read--not very informative, but not bad". After reading 36 out of 195 pages, I've already gotten a grasp of the overall message (make your money work for you). I've also become bored with it. As a future purveyor of doctorate-level counseling/psychological services (fingers crossed, here), reading the dribble that pop-psychologists, self-made millionaires, and the like are allowed to put into print My father handed me this book two nights ago, and said something to the effect of "interesting read--not very informative, but not bad". After reading 36 out of 195 pages, I've already gotten a grasp of the overall message (make your money work for you). I've also become bored with it. As a future purveyor of doctorate-level counseling/psychological services (fingers crossed, here), reading the dribble that pop-psychologists, self-made millionaires, and the like are allowed to put into print nauseates me. I will admit freely that self-help books can be and are a legitimate help to many people. But the fact that Kiyosaki continues to make so much money off of a book full of relatively obvious "revelations" is off-putting to say the least. This book will sit on my bedside table a few more days for the sake of my father's dignity. But I'll be damned if I spend another spare moment reading it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Meutia

    This book is more a motivational book rather than personal finance book. It talks about general things that people knew already. Plus, after reading the analysis of this book by John Reed, I became increasingly skeptical about it: the author is making money out of writing this kind of book instead of through managing his own finances. You can read this book for leisure but it won't help much in managing your personal finance. And if possible, don't buy it, just borrow from local library. This book is more a motivational book rather than personal finance book. It talks about general things that people knew already. Plus, after reading the analysis of this book by John Reed, I became increasingly skeptical about it: the author is making money out of writing this kind of book instead of through managing his own finances. You can read this book for leisure but it won't help much in managing your personal finance. And if possible, don't buy it, just borrow from local library. Personally i won't recommend buying this book to be used as reference or practical guide on personal finance, but if you need a little motivation and self-help guide, go ahead.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Sixteen years ago I met some people who read this book and put its lessons into practice, getting out of the rat-race and into business for themselves, looking to move into the world of big deals and Kiyosaki-style financial freedom. They even had his boardgame; Cashflow - Get Out of the Rat Race!. Now, over a decade and half later their lives have been transformed - their business has failed and they live in a van. That's not to say that there is no useful advice in Rich Dad, Poor Dad, but Sixteen years ago I met some people who read this book and put its lessons into practice, getting out of the rat-race and into business for themselves, looking to move into the world of big deals and Kiyosaki-style financial freedom. They even had his boardgame; Cashflow - Get Out of the Rat Race!. Now, over a decade and half later their lives have been transformed - their business has failed and they live in a van. That's not to say that there is no useful advice in Rich Dad, Poor Dad, but there's also some that seems pretty get-rich-quick, and I would read more widely if you really want to learn about investing, creating wealth and establishing a solid financial future.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Interpretation: 2-stars is more like "meh". This book has been repeatedly referenced by authors I respect, and the curiosity got the better of me. Clearly. Because I read the whole book, thinking there must be something salvageable somewhere. However, I finished it disappointed. The author's greatest weakness is not that he doesn't understand money. He does well. Rather, he gets on the cusp of cracking a code for his readers...and then breaks into a swagger and bravado about his own Interpretation: 2-stars is more like "meh". This book has been repeatedly referenced by authors I respect, and the curiosity got the better of me. Clearly. Because I read the whole book, thinking there must be something salvageable somewhere. However, I finished it disappointed. The author's greatest weakness is not that he doesn't understand money. He does well. Rather, he gets on the cusp of cracking a code for his readers...and then breaks into a swagger and bravado about his own accomplishments + income. Edited down, this is what you need to know: Have assets, not liabilities. There are far better books available with simpler, straight-forward, 1-2-3 steps to follow when building financial security. Bottom line: look elsewhere.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

    This book shares the same fundamental problem that plagues most business how-to's (like The E-Myth): terrible, corny writing. You would think smart, successful people like Kiyosaki and E-Myth's Michael Gerber would be able to retain a decent ghost writer, but you'd be wrong. As for the content, there are a few nuggets of wisdom here but the major revalations and practical guidance that the word of mouth for Rich Dad promised just never materialized. Here's the entire book in a nutshell, "When This book shares the same fundamental problem that plagues most business how-to's (like The E-Myth): terrible, corny writing. You would think smart, successful people like Kiyosaki and E-Myth's Michael Gerber would be able to retain a decent ghost writer, but you'd be wrong. As for the content, there are a few nuggets of wisdom here but the major revalations and practical guidance that the word of mouth for Rich Dad promised just never materialized. Here's the entire book in a nutshell, "When life give you lemons, make lemonade." You could probably also toss in "It takes money to make money." There, I just saved you $16.95.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Peters

    Wow, what ideologically driven, poorly written, paternalistic rubbish! Reading this book reminds me of every conversation I’ve ever had with a middle-aged, white guy, whose sense of entitlement and self-importance has reached such a critical level that as they lecture you on the reality of life, as they see it, while doing so by telling ridiculous, unrealistic parables that border on the nonsensical In Kiyosaki’s mind, the poor are that way because they are lazy, and spend money in the wrong Wow, what ideologically driven, poorly written, paternalistic rubbish! Reading this book reminds me of every conversation I’ve ever had with a middle-aged, white guy, whose sense of entitlement and self-importance has reached such a critical level that as they lecture you on the reality of life, as they see it, while doing so by telling ridiculous, unrealistic parables that border on the nonsensical In Kiyosaki’s mind, the poor are that way because they are lazy, and spend money in the wrong way. The poor should take their paychecks, and buy some property(!) just like Kiyosaki did (although, he admits, what made him wealthy may not work for most). He also admits that McDonalds is the most popular fast food joint not because they sell a superior product, but because they have a superior business model. The lesson to be taken from this, I guess, is that business is not there to provide a better product than their competitor (seemingly against his libertarian-best widget mythology), but rather, to simply run a business. This is the most refreshing and realistic part of the book; capitalism doesn’t care about the product it produces, it’s a business for the sake of being a business. Finally, some realism is injected into the fantasy. But it doesn’t really bode that well for the idea that competition in a capitalistic economy is based on businesses attempts to produce a better product than other businesses. In fact, it doesn’t seem to be about the product at all! Kiyosaki fails to acknowledge of the role privilege plays in this libertarian game. Although, he does admit that the wealthy “groom” their children for a wealthy lifestyle, anyone with even a small sense of honesty would realize that wealth is easy to create when it is handed to you by mommy and daddy. Kiyosaki’s “rich dad” is the one that taught him all these lessons. Kiyosaki’s “poor dad” is a highly educated PhD. I’m willing to bet Kiyosaki has no idea what it is like to be poor. Kiyosaki lucked into wealth (in large part due to authoring a very badly written a book with a coauthor that sued him) and then going around the world and lecturing people about how if you’re not wealthy, its your fault, and if you are, don’t worry about the poor, it’s their fault. The ‘history” (of taxes, socialism, capitalism, et. al.) section of the book is laughable in its ideological assumptions and inaccuracy. But I will spare you. The main point of Kiyosaki’s viewpoint, that everyone can be wealthy, is logically inconsistent. Not everyone can be wealthy, because, who would make the wealth? There would be no workers for the wealthy to exploit to increase their own wealth, while patting themselves on the back for what a good rich person they are. This type of faulty logic and inability to accurately comprehend reality should give anyone pause. Especially if this is the type of person you are taking financial advice from. It is no surprise this clown’s hero is Donald Trump. How many bankruptcies has that guy had? It is also no surprise that a regrettably significant number of Goodreads reviews (no fear, they wouldn’t have read this far into my review) claim this is the first book they could ever read all the way through. Seriously? Here is a good review about this fraud himself... http://www.thesimpledollar.com/decons...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dr Osama

    The book seems interesting from the beginning e.g. how the two fathers view money and financial aspects from different perspectives, how parents usually teach their kids values related to money while school is not giving this issue much. There are good points in the book e.g. financial education, taking calculated risks, investing in creative ideas etc. However, the author seems to see money and being rich as an ultimate goal in life for people. In reality it's really complicated to understand The book seems interesting from the beginning e.g. how the two fathers view money and financial aspects from different perspectives, how parents usually teach their kids values related to money while school is not giving this issue much. There are good points in the book e.g. financial education, taking calculated risks, investing in creative ideas etc. However, the author seems to see money and being rich as an ultimate goal in life for people. In reality it's really complicated to understand the relationship between money and happiness. I'm not finished yet with the book so still not sure about the message which the author try to deliver. "Unfortunately, for many people school is the end, not the beginning" page 56 " ... we haven't learned from history. We only memorise historical dates and names, not the lesson" page 57. "Intelligence solve problems and produces money. Money without financial intelligence is money soon gone" 'Wealth is a person's ability to survive so many number of days forward - or, if I stopped working today, how long could I survive? p. 105' 'We all have tremendous potential, and we all are blessed with gifts. Yet the one thing that holds all of us back is some degree of self doubt, '... excessive fear and self doubt that were the greatest detractors of personal genius' 'In school we learn that mistakes are bad, and we are punished for making them. Yet if you look at the way humans are designed to learn, we learn by making mistakes. We learn to walk by falling down.' P 163 'People who avoid failure also avoid success' 'Financial intelligence is a synergy of accounting, investing, marketing, and law' Job is an acronym for "Just Over Broke" 'Without that little greed,the desire to have something better, progress is not made. Our world progresses because we all desire a better life'. 'Many people use arrogance to try to hide their own ignorance'.

  26. 5 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    What struck me most among the different advices in this book is “spend only on things that will generate income for you” and it was in that part where the author describes the house of his Poor Dad – the tattered door mat, the creaking floor panels, etc. After reading the book, I thought it would be nice to do that but it is easier said than done. For example, when my daughter hinted that she would like to have PS2 when she was still young to understand the value of money, would I refuse or What struck me most among the different advices in this book is “spend only on things that will generate income for you” and it was in that part where the author describes the house of his Poor Dad – the tattered door mat, the creaking floor panels, etc. After reading the book, I thought it would be nice to do that but it is easier said than done. For example, when my daughter hinted that she would like to have PS2 when she was still young to understand the value of money, would I refuse or probably put up a notice on our gate that the PS2 is open for rent for say P10/hour until I get back its cost and earn some profit to generate income? How about the security of my home? How about if those boys do not take good care of the machine? How about if my daughter would like to use it? To some extent, I agree with what critics say about this book – that it almost has no concrete advice. On the other hand, the anecdotal lessons make this book easier to understand and like compared to investment books with all the business formulas and theories.

  27. 4 out of 5

    T.J.

    Inane, self-righteous congratulatory drivel best left to the rubbish heaps.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Rich Dad, Poor Dad is easily one of the most insightful and useful books of our generation. In an ever changing economy it is important for people to have not just academic intelligence but financial intelligence in order to be successful. This book gives so much information that many people never learned in school, college or from their parents. This book teaches smart ways to invest and ways to make your money work for you instead of having to work for your money. This book appeals to all types Rich Dad, Poor Dad is easily one of the most insightful and useful books of our generation. In an ever changing economy it is important for people to have not just academic intelligence but financial intelligence in order to be successful. This book gives so much information that many people never learned in school, college or from their parents. This book teaches smart ways to invest and ways to make your money work for you instead of having to work for your money. This book appeals to all types of people. Whether you be a middle aged adult in a poor financial status, a rich person who doesn’t know what to do with their money or a young teenager hoping to succeed in the brutal economy of America this book will help. Kiyosaki gives many examples of why people fail to succeed with their financing and how people can better themselves in the long run. He also presents all his information in a very simple and easy to understand way and there was never a time where I felt lost in what he was saying. Some of the down sides to this book are that he gives very few examples of the different ways you can invest. Since the author is big into real estate most of his examples are based on things that he has done. However, real estate is not easy to get into and many people would not enjoy doing this kind of investing. Overall this book is a very good read and it is important that everyone read some kind of book, if not this one, that relates to financing in order to have a better future. I was oblivious to the information provided in this book but now that I know how real finances work I feel prepared to face my financial situation head on.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Girish

    Way back, when I was in college, one of my teachers recommended this book to me as a must read before I started earning. Characteristic of a college student, I ignored it completely. Wish I had read this way back! Needless to say, when I finished it, I recommended it to everyone I cared about. This book is like a must read for Financial literacy (not education) - what is not taught in school nor the social set-up. Using anecdotes and simplified explanations, the author drives home the point of Way back, when I was in college, one of my teachers recommended this book to me as a must read before I started earning. Characteristic of a college student, I ignored it completely. Wish I had read this way back! Needless to say, when I finished it, I recommended it to everyone I cared about. This book is like a must read for Financial literacy (not education) - what is not taught in school nor the social set-up. Using anecdotes and simplified explanations, the author drives home the point of how becoming rich is a choice and how money can work for you. Not that everything is acceptable, but then, it is far more educational than the gazillion books on money / investment. Using the two polar opposite viewpoints of Rich Dad and Poor Dad, the author explains his understanding of how to develop a healthy attitude towards money (which is basically a concept) and getting rich is a lot more mindset change and self control than opportuities. The leasons were hard hitting and you feel a bit restless of what the book is doing to you. A must read!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Otis Chandler

    I loved this book because it was a simple intro to buying real estate, much as The Wealthy Barber was a simple intro to personal finance. I remember one of my favorite parts was where he examines the statement by many people that shows that the stock market has beaten the real estate annually in a historical comparison. Kiyosacki pointed out though that if you look at return on your money real estate wins hands down because you only have to put in 10% of your own money. So if you buy a 100K I loved this book because it was a simple intro to buying real estate, much as The Wealthy Barber was a simple intro to personal finance. I remember one of my favorite parts was where he examines the statement by many people that shows that the stock market has beaten the real estate annually in a historical comparison. Kiyosacki pointed out though that if you look at return on your money real estate wins hands down because you only have to put in 10% of your own money. So if you buy a 100K house with 10K, borrowing the 90K, and it appreciates to 105K after a year - you've got a 50% return.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.